Palin to tea partiers: Don’t go thinking you’re going to change anything.

Posted by Jason | Posted in Miscellaneous | Posted on 17-02-2010

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In case you missed my recent post on bipartisanship, Palin highlights my analogy of American politics being like bumper bowling. Palin loves acting like she’s above party, and she’s ready to take on either party. Then as she starts seeing her 2012 nomination in the crosshairs, she quickly says “Teapartiers, it’s been fun, but it’s time to forget all this anger against your government. It’s time to realize you have no say, so just pick an R or D and get back to work. The government needs your taxes.” I’m paraphrasing of course. She didn’t really say that, but that’s pretty much what she means.

Asked what her advice would be to conservatives as the November elections approach, Palin first lavished praise on the Tea Party movement, calling it “a grand movement” and adding, “I love it because it’s all about the people.”

But she quickly pivoted to the broader question of whether the Tea Party movement might successfully field its own candidates in national elections, and on that point she sounded far from convinced.

“Now the smart thing will be for independents who are such a part of this Tea Party movement to, I guess, kind of start picking a party,” Palin said. “Which party reflects how that smaller, smarter government steps to be taken? Which party will best fit you? And then because the Tea Party movement is not a party, and we have a two-party system, they’re going to have to pick a party and run one or the other: ‘R’ or ‘D’.”

via Hot Air » Blog Archive » Palin to tea partiers: You’re going to have to choose between the parties.

Ah, Republicans love the tea parties until they realize the teapartiers don’t like them either.

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Comments (6)

For all kinds of reasons (single-member districts, the Electoral College, separation of powers, etc.) American government is structurally a two-party system. It is, sadly or not, a fantasy to think that a new party can burst from nowhere and achieve real power except in the most extraordinary circumstances (and this is not 1860 when both parties split over slavery.) Even Teddy Roosevelt only succeeded in giving us eight years of Woodrow Wilson.

The TEA Party can have enormous influence in terms of public education, giving and withholding support, and candidate and issue selection within either or both existing parties. It does not need to be absorbed by them, but it must work within them, or at least one of them if it is to be effective. The Scott Brown formula is very attractive – a coalition of Republicans, TEA Partiers, independents and disaffected Democrats. The energy of the TEA Party and the strength of their issues can make them the predominant force in such a coalition. There will be some situations (NY23, for instance) where the powers that be need to be sent a message, but in most cases it will be better to work within the system (see M. Rubio) than to be a voice crying in the wilderness.

Reagan and Gingrich changed things, and the opportunity exists to go beyond that now. But only if in power.

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Mahon,

“It is …. fantasy to think that a new party can burst from nowhere and achieve real power..”

A) I never said it would burst out of no where. No third party has just bursted out of nowhere in our country. It takes winning the small seats of government to eventually make it to the big stage. There is no reason the tea party, the libertarians, or some unknown third party could not win seats. It would take winning many seats before President could be considered.

B) Who said I want a part to gain power? I want a movement to strip power from the federal government. Personally, I can care less what party they are.

Lastly, in my article I never said the tea party had to form its own party. I was just saying that they should not just pick an R or D just because they are told to by Palin. There are independents in our government. They could vote independent or in the long run if they could coalesce around some simple principle, such as the principles of the founders, they could form their own party.

Your example of Scott Brown is a perfect example. Yes, it was worth electing him to defeat ObamaCare, but in the long run he is a big government, big spending conservative. He’s for government health care, just not Obama’s. They must pick the fights as needed to shrink government, and they should not just decide it’s going to be Republicans. We found out how quickly elected Republicans change their beliefs once they have power.

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You can vote for any candidate you like, as long as its Communist.

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You mean as long as they are statists. Most of our politicians are fascists, who believe in corporate welfare and cronyism. Democrats just preach the virtues of social programs to enslave the poor so they won’t interfer while they rob their neighbors.

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Honestly, she’s absolutely right. All this huffing and puffing will change little in how Washington operates. Sure, Scott Brown got elected, and that was great (even though Independent Joe Kennedy was actually the more conservative and better fit for the Tea Party candidate), but so what?

This Tea Party movement will change behavior for 1 or 2 years, maybe even through 2012, but the anger and pressure will subside like it always does. It’s impossible for people to stay focused and on message for an extended period of time, likely close to or more than a decade necessary in order to change behavior and make a real dent in shrinking gov and restoring our liberties.

Call me jaded, but I just don’t see it happening.

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Hey Jaded, how’s it going. I know. Couldn’t resist. Anyway, I guess I am not as jaded yet. I think the movement can operate within the parties, outside the parties, or start their own. The biggest hurdle to starting a new party is the media, but the good thing for the teapartiers is they already have a lot of press.

Then again, I am probably just trying to stay positive. They will probably end up getting manipulated by people like Palin, and nothing will change.

In that case, it might just be pointless to even be involved in the voting process.

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